Overweight and Obesity

 

1. The percentage of overweight children in the United States is growing at an alarming rate  1 out of 3 kids are now considered overweight or obese. Many kids are spending less time fexercising and more time in front of the TV, computer, or video-game console. And today's busy families have fewer free moments to prepare nutritious, home-cooked meals, day in and day out. From fast food to electronics, quick and easy seems to be the mindset of many people in the new millennium. Preventing kids from becoming overweight means adapting the way your family eats and exercises, and how you spend time together. Helping kids lead healthy lifestyles begins with parents who lead by example.

Is Your Child Overweight?

2. Body mass index (BMI) uses height and weight measurements to estimate how much body fat a person has. To calculate BMI, divide weight in kg by height in meters squared, or wt/ht2. For pounds and inches, divide weight by height squared and multiply the result by the conversion factor 703. An easier way to measure BMI is to use a BMI calculator. Once you know your child's BMI, it can be plotted on a standard BMI chart. Kids fall into one of four categories:

  1. underweight: BMI below the 5th percentile
  2. normal weight: BMI at the 5th and less than the 85th percentile
  3. overweight: BMI at the 85th and below 95th percentiles
  4. obese: BMI at or above 95th percentile

3. BMI is not a perfect measure of body fat and there are situations where BMI may be misleading. For example, a muscular person may have a high BMI without being overweight (because extra muscle adds to a person's body weight but not fatness). In addition, BMI may be difficult to interpret during puberty when kids are experiencing periods of rapid growth. It's important to remember that BMI is usually a good indicator but is not a direct measurement of body fat. If you're worried that your child or teen may be overweight, make an appointment with your doctor, who can assess your child's eating and activity habits and make suggestions on how to make positive changes. The doctor may also decide to screen for some of the medical conditions that can be associated with obesity. Depending on your child's BMI, age, and health, the doctor may refer you to a registered dietitian for additional advice. In some cases, your doctor may recommend a comprehensive weight management program.

The Effects of Obesity

4. Obesity increases the risk for serious health conditions like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol all once considered exclusively adult diseases. Obese kids may also be prone to low self-esteem that stems from being teased, bullied, or rejected by peers. Kids who are unhappy with their weight may be more likely than average-weight kids to develop unhealthy dieting habits and eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia, and they may be more prone to depression, as well as substance abuse. Overweight and obese kids are at risk for developing medical problems that affect their present and future health and quality of life, including:

5. Cardiovascular risk factors present in childhood (including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes) can lead to serious medical problems like heart disease, heart failure, and stroke as adults. Preventing or treating overweight and obesity in kids may reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease as they get older.

Causes of Overweight

6. A number of factors contribute to becoming overweight. Genetics, lifestyle habits, or a combination of both may be involved. In some instances, endocrine problems, genetic syndromes, and medications can be associated with excessive weight gain. Much of what we eat is quick and easy from fat-laden fast food to microwave and prepackaged meals. Daily schedules are so jam-packed that there's little time to prepare healthier meals or to squeeze in some exercise. Portion sizes, in the home and out, have drastically increased. Plus, now, more than ever, life is sedentary kids spend more time playing with electronic devices, from computers to handheld video game systems, than actively playing outside. Television is a major culprit.

7. Kids younger than 6 spend an average of 2 hours a day in front of a screen, mostly watching TV or videos. Older kids and teens spend almost 4 hours a day watching TV or videos. When computer use and video games are included, time spent in front of a screen increases to over 5 hours a day! Kids who watch more than 4 hours a day are more likely to be overweight compared with kids who watch 2 hours or less. Not surprisingly, TV in the bedroom is also linked to increased likelihood of being overweight. In other words, for many kids, once they get home from school, virtually all of their free time is spent in front of one screen or another!

8. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) currently recommends limiting the time kids over 2 years of age spend in front of a screen to no more than 1-2 hours. The AAP also discourages any screen time for children younger than 2 years. Many kids don't get enough physical activity. Although physical education (PE) in schools can help kids get up and moving, more and more schools are eliminating PE programs or cutting down the time spent on fitness-building activities. One study showed that gym classes offered third-graders just 25 minutes of vigorous activity each week. Current guidelines recommend that kids over 2 years of age should engage in at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity on most, preferably all, days of the week.

9. Genetics also play a role genes help determine body type and how your body stores and burns fat just like they help determine other traits. Genes alone, however, cannot explain the current obesity crisis. Because both genes and habits can be passed down from one generation to the next, multiple members of a family may struggle with weight. People in the same family tend to have similar eating patterns, maintain the same levels of physical activity, and adopt the same attitudes toward being overweight. Studies have shown that a child's risk of obesity greatly increases if one or more parent is overweight or obese.

Preventing Overweight and Obesity

10. The key to keeping kids of all ages at a healthy weight is taking a whole-family approach. It's the "practice what you preach" mentality. Make healthy eating and exercise a family affair. Get your kids involved by letting them help you plan and prepare healthy meals, and take them along when you go grocery shopping so they can learn how to make good food choices.

Avoid falling into some common food/eating behavior traps:

Here are some additional recommendations for kids of all ages:

11. If you eat well, exercise regularly, and incorporate healthy habits into your family's daily life, you're modeling a healthy lifestyle for your kids that will last. Talk to your kids about the importance of eating well and being active, but make it a family affair that will become second nature for everyone.

Most of all, let your kids know you love them no matter what their weight and that you want to help them be happy and healthy.

Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD
Date reviewed: June 2008